IDG Contributor Network: SaaS is eating the infrastructure world

In many ways, we can compare the future of the software world to the emergence of self-driving cars. Just as we’re faced with questions around a unified set of operational standards for all companies eager to remove drivers from behind the wheel, serverless computing poses a similar set of challenges as software eats further and further into the infrastructure stack.

When that happens, the driver (or in this case, the infrastructure) will disappear into the background and the car (in this case, software applications) will take center stage. Whether we’re talking driverless cars or serverless computing, it’s going to be a bumpy road ahead as companies start to adapt. Here’s a look at what will happen when software eats the infrastructure world.

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IDG Contributor Network: Data science is easy; making it work is hard

In the world of data science, there are three core problems: acquiring data, doing the math and taking action. Two of those drive data scientists crazy; the other one they find easy.

jan2017 imageCapgemini

“Doing the math” is what most people think of as data science. Algorithms, machine learning, cognitive tools, deep learning and the word stochastic are often not far away. That’s the easy bit.

Now let me define easy:

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Cloud Computing

IDG Contributor Network: Red Hat expected to rake in $2.4 billion in revenue this year

The king of Linux, Red Hat, continues its growth as a leading Linux vendor that’s betting big on the cloud. Yesterday, the company announced financial results for its second quarter of fiscal year 2017 ended August 31, 2016.

The company generated $ 600 million in revenue for the quarter, a 19 percent year-over-year increase. Red Hat is often credited with creating a business model around Linux and Open Source: a subscription based service and support model.

Subscription revenue for the quarter was $ 531 million, which accounts for 89% of total revenue. It was a 20% year-over-year increase. Based on these numbers we can safely assume that Red Hat will be generating revenues around $ 2.415 billion in this fiscal year. That makes Red Hat the most successful pure open source company to date.

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IDG Contributor Network: Snapdeal gives OpenStack a much-needed pre-summit fillip

OpenStack is an interesting initiative — it has, perhaps more than any other open source initiative, polarized commentators. On one end are those who say that OpenStack is a “dead duck,” that it will see no success and that it is hampered by too many conflicting commercial and governance drivers.

On the other end of the continuum are those who suggest that OpenStack is, most likely, the best thing since sliced bread. OpenStack will, it would seem listening to these folks, deliver world peace and a cure for cancer.

Of course the truth is somewhere in between these two extremes and OpenStack will be an important part of the technology landscape, alongside a host of other products and projects.

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IDG Contributor Network: Why did Gentoo Linux fade into obscurity?

Why did Gentoo Linux fade into obscurity?

Gentoo Linux was fairly well known at one point, with many tech-savvy Linux users opting to run it on their computers. But Gentoo Linux slowly lost popularity over time and is now a pale shadow of its former self in terms of usage and mind-share among Linux users (though there are still some die-hard Gentoo users left on Reddit).

What happened to Gentoo Linux? A redditor asked this question in a recent thread on the Linux subreddit and got some very interesting answers.

Walfers: “Why did Gentoo peak in popularity in 2005, then fade into obscurity?”

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All articles

IDG Contributor Network: HP’s OpenSwitch becomes a Linux Foundation Project

HP’s open source networking operating system, OpenSwitch, is now a Linux Foundation project.

Many industry players are joining the project, including Broadcom, Cavium, Extreme Networks, LinkedIn, Mellanox, Nephos Inc., P4.org, Quattro Networks, SnapRoute and, of course, Hewlett Packard Enterprise.

OpenSwitch is full-featured, Linux-based modular and modern network operating system that provides support for traditional and cloud networking environments.

Commenting on the arrival of OpenSwicth Jim Zemlin, executive director at The Linux Foundation said, “OpenSwitch brings another important ingredient of the open networking stack to The Linux Foundation. We’re looking forward to working with this community to advance networking across the enterprise.”

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CIO Cloud Computing


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IDG Contributor Network: Apprenda Acquires Kismatic, Releases a New Kubernetes Distribution

Apprenda, a provider of cloud software, has acquired Kismatic, a company that offers Kubernetes support to enterprise customers. With this acquisition, Apprenda has also launched a new Kubernetes distribution, along with new enterprise support subscriptions available to any company using the Kubernetes container management system.

Despite being a relatively new technology, “people are running Kubernetes to power microservices, highly trafficked Web properties, and as a foundation for appliances focused on cloud infrastructure build outs. It’s being used in both medium-sized and large enterprises alike, including many Fortune 500 companies,” said Sinclair Schuller, CEO, and co-founder of Apprenda in an email.

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CIO Cloud Computing

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IDG Contributor Network: Is Enterprise content management becoming obsolete and irrelevant?

As CIOs look for better value from their enterprise content management (ECM) solutions, they’re finding more cost effective ways of operating from cloud based file storage vendors. Box, Google Drive, AWS and others provide the same capabilities offered by expensive ECM solutions. In this article, ECM refers to a solution that stores unstructured data, such as documents, images, and plain text.

Traditional ECM solutions are no longer cost competitive and do not provide any additional value over the simple indexing, storage and retrieval capabilities. Shifting ECM management of infrastructure, maintenance and operations to cloud based file storage vendors seems unavoidable to stay cost competitive.

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IDG Contributor Network: IoT security will soon be common in the enterprise, Gartner says

A fifth of all businesses will have deployed IoT-related security by the end of 2017, analyst Gartner thinks.

Dedicated digital security services that are committed to “protecting business initiatives using devices and services in the Internet of Things” will be in place by then, the research and advisory company says.

Gartner made the statement in a press release on its website in relation to a security and risk management summit earlier this month in Mumbai.

‘Reshape IT’

“The IoT redefines security,” Ganesh Ramamoorthy, research vice president at Gartner, said in the press release.

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Uncategorized

IDG Contributor Network: 5 myths about data encryption

It’s a heartache, nothing but a heartache. Hits you when it’s too late, hits you when you’re down. It’s a fools’ game, nothing but a fool’s game. Standing in the cold rain, feeling like a clown.

When singer Bonnie Tyler recorded in her distinctive raspy voice “It’s A Heartache” in 1978, you’d think she was an oracle of sorts, predicting the rocky road that encryption would have to travel.

Just a year earlier in 1977 the Encryption Standard (DES) became the federal standard for block symmetric encryption (FIPS 46). But, oh, what a disappointment encryption DES would become. In less than 20 years since its inception, DES would be declared DOA (dead on arrival), impenetrable NOT.

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