Pain Free Web Development Using ASP.Net

There are many benefits of choosing ASP dot NET web development. This type of framework was created by Microsoft and is used specifically to create web applications, web service sand web sites. Unlike previous frameworks ASP. NET utilizes common language runtime. This means that there are many different languages that are supported by ASP. NET.

There are many benefits of choosing ASP dot NET web development. This type of framework was created by Microsoft and is used specifically to create web applications, web service sand web sites. Unlike previous frameworks ASP. NET utilizes common language runtime. This means that there are many different languages that are supported by ASP. NET.

The types of pages that use. NET are called web forms and these are the building blocks of web applications. These aspx forms can contain static info as well as web controls and user controls. There are also several different types of dynamic code that can be used in programming the application or web forms.

A lot of the directories and controls can be completely customized and these areas include BIN, APP_browsers, APP_WebReferences, APP-code, APP_GlobalResources, APP_data and APP_Themes. There are many other different file extensions that can be incorporated into your ASP. NET applications that include asax, edmz, ascx, svc, ashx, skin, asmx, sitemap, axd, resx, browser, master, config, dbml and cs/vb.

When using ASP. NET you will find that your application will run faster than before. This is mainly due to the fact that all of the code is saved on the web server in one or more DLL files. With ASP. NeT this is done automatically when the page request is made. You then can place the ASPX on any server that is compatible with ASP. NET.

Web developers find ASP. NET much easier to use then other frameworks as it uses a lot of functions that is found in Windows. Much of the controls and user interface is the same. Unlike previous frameworks ASP. NET is positive for even driven GUI and is not as positive for web scripting events.

A few of the other differences between ASP and ASP. NET include the multi-language capabilities involved in the common runtime language for ASP. NET, the runtime error handling has been greatly improved in ASP. NET, you can cache the entire web page which increases the performance using ASP. NET and the compiled code allows the applications to run faster.

If you would like to learn more about ASP.NET training courses, visit Macresource Computer Training, an independent computer training company offering ASP.NET training courses at their central London training centre.

Let Adobe Dreamweaver Be Your Web Development Companion

Our company runs training courses on Adobe Dreamweaver, the industry-standard web development software. And we are increasingly finding that the profile of the person wanting to learn Dreamweaver is becoming distinctly, well, frankly, unpredictable! It seems that just about anyone nowadays can find themselves needing to build a website or to create web content in some shape or form.

Our company runs training courses on Adobe Dreamweaver, the industry-standard web development software. And we are increasingly finding that the profile of the person wanting to learn Dreamweaver is becoming distinctly, well, frankly, unpredictable! It seems that just about anyone nowadays can find themselves needing to build a website or to create web content in some shape or form.

Our conclusion is that the vast majority of people learning Dreamweaver nowadays are not specialists in web development or web design. They are simply people who need to develop web content in some shape or form and who have chosen or been recommended Dreamweaver as the best tool for the job. Dreamweaver is perceived as the obvious choice for both casual and professional web developers.

Dreamweaver has become the industry standard web development software, seeing off rivals like Microsoft FrontPage. And it deserves its position. It is a great software package with powerful features and an approachable interface which lets anybody who can use a computer embark on a basic software development project and, with a bit of patience and knowledge of a few fundamentals, bring it to a conclusion. Dreamweaver has attained this dominant position because its creators have always aimed to satisfy the needs of all the different types of users of their software.

In the early days of the web, all web development was done using fairly raw tools, like Windows Notepad. In the mid to late nineties, when companies started releasing WYSIWYG editors which allowed users to work in a user-friendly, visual environment, serious web developers didn’t rate these programs very highly. Even in those days, however, Dreamweaver was a cut above the rest. Macromedia wooed coders by bundling popular code editing software with Dreamweaver (HomeSite on Windows and BBEdit on Macintosh.)

With each release of Dreamweaver, Macromedia continued to add features which showed that they understood the need to create clean code even when using visual tools. They added features to the program for maintaining the integrity of code and removing redundant elements. They enhanced their coding environment with features like line numbering, code hints and the tag selector, a feature which displays the tag underlying the currently selected element and the hierarchy of tags in which the element is contained. They also added the ability to verify whether a web page contained code incompatible with certain browsers.

Another important feature that has helped to mark out Dreamweaver as a serious web development tool is its inclusion of tools for generating dynamic server side content using industry standard scripting languages such as ASP and ColdFusion and, later, ASP.Net and PHP. This functionality was originally introduced in mid 2000 in a slightly more expensive edition of Dreamweaver called Dreamweaver UltraDev. The idea back then was that heavyweight web developers would buy UltraDev and lightweights would buy the standard edition of Dreamweaver. However, in 2002, Macromedia simply stopped making UltraDev and put all of its functionality into the much cheaper standard edition of Dreamweaver, making Dreamweaver the obvious choice for web developers of all types.

Recognising that many web developers are members of a team, Macromedia also added features to Dreamweaver allowing teams of people to collaborate on the same site while avoiding the risk of two people making conflicting changes to the same page. Dreamweaver’s collaborative features were called “File Check in/Check out”. The program also introduced a feature known as “Design Notes”. This allowed one developer to attach a note to a particular web page which could then be browsed by other members of his or her team.

The web is constantly evolving and new technologies are being developed to make web sites more appealing to visitors. The owners of Dreamweaver have always been very good at embracing these new technologies sooner rather than later. An illustration of this can be seen in the latest version of Dreamweaver which includes a series of CSS layouts which can be used by newbie web developers to create pages which separate web content from information relating to the styling of that content. Dreamweaver also has useful features for making it easy to make your content accessible to web surfers with disabilities.

The newest release of Dreamweaver, CS3, also includes support for Ajax an exciting new way of creating interactive Web applications using XHTML, CSS and JavaScript. Dreamweaver’s implementation of Ajax is via Adobe’s Spry Framework for Ajax. Using the easy to use Spry interface, developers can create sophisticated Ajax interface elements, special effects and display data-driven content on their pages.

As new features are added to Dreamweaver with each new release, the program continues to have an interface which is user-friendly and approachable by any experienced computer user, bringing web development within reach of just about everybody on the planet. And it is this policy of satisfying the needs of professionals as well as beginners which will doubtless continue to make it the obvious choice for anyone wanting to develop web content at any level.

You can find out more about Dreamweaver training courses, visit Macresource Computer Training, an independent computer training company offering Dreamweaver training courses at their central London training centre.

Adobe Dreamweaver’s Server Behaviors Saves Hours Of Coding

Behaviors and server behaviors have been in use in Dreamweaver since the days when it was owned by Macromedia; in fact, since the days when there was a variety of Dreamweaver called Dreamweaver UltraDev. They both refer provide a method of adding interactivity to a web page by generating a variety of scripts which would often be time-consuming to create manually. The difference between the two types of behavior, as the names imply, is that server behaviors generate client-side scripts while server behaviors automatically create server-side code.

Behaviors and server behaviors have been in use in Dreamweaver since the days when it was owned by Macromedia; in fact, since the days when there was a variety of Dreamweaver called Dreamweaver UltraDev. They both refer provide a method of adding interactivity to a web page by generating a variety of scripts which would often be time-consuming to create manually. The difference between the two types of behavior, as the names imply, is that server behaviors generate client-side scripts while server behaviors automatically create server-side code.

Dreamweaver Behaviors will always generate code written in JavaScript, by far the most commonly-used client-side scripting language. The code generated by JavaScript behaviors perform a number of useful function such as plug-in and browser detection and form validation. Some of these behaviors are a bit long in the tooth, have not been updated for several versions of Dreamweaver and, in some cases, have been superseded by Spry, Dreamweaver’s implementation of Ajax.

Server behaviors, by contrast, can generate code in no fewer than five server-side scripting languages: ColdFusion, ASP, JSP, ASP.Net and PHP. The language chosen is determined by the language specified as that which should be used on the testing server. This is part of the site definition and dictates the default document type for all new files.

Dreamweaver’s preset server behaviors provide quite a broad range of features but most of them relate to the manipulation of data objects which are the main thrust of Dreamweaver’s server-side development capabilities. One of the first behaviors new Dreamweaver developers will encounter is “Repeat Region”. This allows you to select any element or region of a page and specify that it will repeat for as many items as there are in a given set of data. A classic use of this is the repetition of a table row or list item. Naturally, dynamic data, such as a product name, product image, product description, will also be inserted within the area being repeated.

The Show Region server behaviors are also very useful. There are six different variations on the same theme: “Show Region if Recordset is Empty”,”Show Region if Recordset is not Empty”,”Show Region if First Record”, “Show Region if not First Record”, “Show Region if Last Record” and “Show Region if not Last Record”.

The first two variations allow developers to create a region of a page which will only be displayed if a given data set is either empty or not empty. So, for example, you would select the entire repeat region mentioned above and use the “Show Region if Recordset is not Empty” behavior. Then you would create a message such as “Sorry, no records match your search criteria.”, highlight it and use the “Show Region if Recordset is Empty” to make its display conditional.

You can find out more about Dreamweaver training courses, visit Macresource Computer Training, a UK IT training company offering Dreamweaver training courses at their central London training centre.

Dreamweaver Templates Make Web Development A Breeze

Whenever the computer training company I work for runs Dreamweaver training courses, we always ensure that the topic of templates is included. They are such a great time-saving feature. Templates can be used in two ways: firstly, a new page can be based on a template and, secondly, a template can be applied to an existing page. To create a new page based on a template, proceed as follows.

Whenever the computer training company I work for runs Dreamweaver training courses, we always ensure that the topic of templates is included. They are such a great time-saving feature. Templates can be used in two ways: firstly, a new page can be based on a template and, secondly, a template can be applied to an existing page. To create a new page based on a template, proceed as follows.

1. Choose New from the File menu.

2. Click on Blank Template, in the first column of the New Document window.

3. In the second column, choose the “Page Type” you would like to create (HTML, ASP, ASP.NET, ColdFusion, JSP OR PHP).

4. In the third column, marked “Layout”, you may optionally choose one of Dreamweaver’s excellent CSS layouts.

5. Finally, in the fourth column of the New Document dialog, specify whether you would like your CSS code placed in the head area of the template, in a new CSS file or in an existing CSS file. (Naturally, this option only applies if you choose to use one of the preset CSS layouts.)

If you wish to apply a template to an existing page, perform the following steps.

1. Open the page in question.

2. Choose Modify – Templates – Apply Template to Page.

3. Double-click the name of the template you wish to associate with the page.

Dreamweaver templates use a system of editable regions to mark areas of the page which may be modified whenever the template is used. Editable regions may contain placeholders such as text or graphics. Graphic placeholders are ideal for marking an area of a page where an image is to be inserted. Each time the template is used, a different image can be substituted for the placeholder. To replace a graphic placeholder, do the following.

1. Create or open a page based on a template.

2. Double-click the graphic placeholder.

3. Navigate to the image which will replace the placeholder.

4. Double-click the name of the image.

The name of the template controlling a page is displayed in the top right and the name of each editable region is shown above the appropriate area of the page. The editable region labels compromise the WYSIWYG display of your page slightly by pushing elements down. To switch off the display of template and editable region names, choose View – Visual Aids – Invisible Elements. Use the same command to reinstate them.

Dreamweaver normally places a light blue rectangle around editable regions in both templates and documents based on them. It also places a yellow rectangle around any page based on a template. The same yellow highlight also shows up in code view to mark the locked regions of a page based on a template. Dreamweaver allows you to change these highlight colours.

1. Choose Preferences from the Edit menu.

2. Click on the category heading Highlighting on the left of the window.

3. Choose a colour from the pop-up palettes next to Editable regions and Locked Regions

From time to time, you will have pages which you need to treat as independent and which you do not want controlled by a template. Obviously, you can simply avoid attaching a template to such pages. However, you will often find it useful to apply a template to the page, to obtain formatting elements and then to detach the page from the template. To detach a page from its template, choose Modify – Templates – Detach from Template.

If you have the Assets panel open, you can also update the current page by dragging the appropriate template icon from the Templates section onto the page. This technique can also be used to apply a template to a page or to change the template on which a page is based.

To learn more about Dreamweaver training courses, visit Macresource Computer Training, an independent computer training company offering Dreamweaver training courses in London and throughout the UK.

Testing Your Dreamweaver Site With Preview In Browser

When working on your web pages in Adobe Dreamweaver, you constantly need to check them in a web browser. To make this process smoother, Dreamweaver allows you to configure several browsers for previewing your pages. You can specify which browser is your primary, or main, browser; you can then elect a secondary browser and as many further browsers as you want.

When working on your web pages in Adobe Dreamweaver, you constantly need to check them in a web browser. To make this process smoother, Dreamweaver allows you to configure several browsers for previewing your pages. You can specify which browser is your primary, or main, browser; you can then elect a secondary browser and as many further browsers as you want.

Naturally, the first step in this procedure is to ensure that all the browser software is installed on your computer. Next, on Windows, go to the Edit menu and choose Preferences; on a Macintosh, go to the Dreamweaver menu and choose Preferences.

The various types of Preferences are displayed on the left of the window. Click on the Preview in Browser section. If you already have a browser configured as your primary browser, and possibly another as your secondary, you may wish to change these. To do so, simply click on the appropriate checkboxes to specify which is primary and which is secondary.

To add other browsers, just click on the plus sign (+), navigate to the browser software and double-click to open it. You can repeat this procedure as many times as you need to.

To preview a page using one of your configured browsers, click on the preview icon (the globe) located on the Document toolbar which is normally displayed at the top of the document window. From the drop-down menu, choose the browser that you’d like to use. You can also use the keyboard shortcuts: to preview using your primary browser press Shift-F12 on Windows or option-F12 on a Macintosh; to preview in the secondary browser press Control-F12 on Windows or Command-F12 on a Macintosh. Alternatively, simply choose the name of any other browser.

Having looked at the preview, to return to Dreamweaver, simply close the browser window.

It is also possible that sometimes you’d like to preview pages without saving the changes you’ve made to your document. Dreamweaver makes this easy but, first, let’s have a look at what normally happens when you preview a file that has been modified.

Dreamweaver throws up a dialogue box asking us if we’d like to save the changes. If you choose “No”, it gives us a preview of the last version that you saved rather than the version that you’re currently working on, If we choose “Yes”, Dreamweaver saves your changes before previewing the file. This can often be inconvenient, since you may not be ready to save your changes.

If you’d like to be able to preview a file at any time without saving your changes, return to your Browser Preview category of Dreamweaver’s Preferences and activate the option “Preview Using Temporary File”. When this option is activated, Dreamweaver will create a temporary file containing the latest version of your document and then opens it in the browser. When the browser window opens, you will notice that the file name does not correspond to the name of your document it a temporary file name generated by Dreamweaver.

If you would like to learn more about Dreamweaver training courses, visit Macresource Computer Training, an independent computer training company offering Dreamweaver Classes in London and throughout the UK.

Using Adobe Dreamweaver’s Files panel

Most of your work in Adobe Dreamweaver is done in one or other of two views: files and document. The Files panel gives you an overview of the entire site and work with the entire site structure. It shows listings of the files in your local root folder and on your server. When you open any document, by contrast, you work on one HTML page at a time, adding and modifying content as necessary.

Most of your work in Adobe Dreamweaver is done in one or other of two views: files and document. The Files panel gives you an overview of the entire site and work with the entire site structure. It shows listings of the files in your local root folder and on your server. When you open any document, by contrast, you work on one HTML page at a time, adding and modifying content as necessary.

When you click OK after creating a new site, Dreamweaver will open the Files panel automatically and the site you have just created will be the active site. You can also enter site Files view at any time by choosing Window – Files. You can activate a particular site by choosing its name from the site pop-up menu. You can also choose Site – Manage Site and then select the desired site name and click Done.

There are two listings in the Files panel: on your right, the files in your local root folder are displayed; on your left are shown the files on your server. The toolbar above the file listing contains tools for uploading and downloading files to and from your server. Moving your mouse over an icon displays a tooltip explaining its function. The Connect button is used to establish a connection to the remote server. The Put button uploads the selected file(s) to the server. The Get button downloads files from the server.

Before putting any content into your web pages, the firs step is usually to create all of the HTML files your site will need together with any necessary subdirectories. To create a new file or folder in a particular folder, right click the name of the folder (or of one of the documents inside it) and choose New File or New Folder from the context menu. You can also highlight the relevant folder (or a document inside it) then choose New File or New Folder from the File menu. When creating documents, be sure to enter the necessary file extension: you may type either “.html” or “.htm”. Naturally, folder names do not need an extension.

One of the chief advantages of creating all the files needed for a web site in Files panel view before beginning to edit any documents is that links between pages can then be created by browsing for the linked page which otherwise would not yet exist. Dreamweaver also has a useful Point to File facility whereby a link can be created by dragging from the link object to the linked file.

Next to each folder which contains items, Dreamweaver displays a plus sign (+) is shown. To display the contents of a folder, simply click once on the plus sign. When the contents of a folder are displayed, the plus sign changes to a minus. To hide the contents of a folder, click the minus sign.

Working with Files panel view is very similar to working in Windows Explorer or the Macintosh Finder. To delete a file or folder, click once on the item to highlight it then press Delete or Backspace. You can also right-click on the file or folder and choose Edit-Delete from the context menu. It is also important to remember that the site listing is a live indication of a section of your hard disk. When you delete a file or folder, you are deleting an item from your hard disk in real time.

To highlight a non-contiguous range of items, click on the first item then, with the Control (Command) key held down, click on each of the items you wish to add to the selection. The items being selected can be in separate folders and you may collapse and expand folders during the operation without destroying the selection.

To change the name of a file or folder in Files panel view, click on the item with the right mouse then choose Edit – Rename from the context menu. As with Windows Explorer and the Mac Finder, you can also click twice on the current name of the item, taking care that the two clicks are on slightly different parts of the name. The name will then be highlighted, ready to be edited.

If you want more information Dreamweaver training courses, visit Macresource Computer Training, a UK IT training company offering Dreamweaver training courses at their central London training centre.

Designing Audience-Friendly Web Pages

With so many organisations using the internet as an electronic storefront for selling their wares, web page design has become a fast-growing occupation. However, there is still a lot of argument as to how best to design a web page with those having a background in graphic arts opting for a website that has visually appeal and those with a more technical background preferring web page design to incorporate elements that are inviting to internet search engines. These two approaches will often collide on the site’s structure, but the common goal is surely to drive more traffic to the website in question.

With so many organisations using the internet as an electronic storefront for selling their wares, web page design has become a fast-growing occupation. However, there is still a lot of argument as to how best to design a web page with those having a background in graphic arts opting for a website that has visually appeal and those with a more technical background preferring web page design to incorporate elements that are inviting to internet search engines. These two approaches will often collide on the site’s structure, but the common goal is surely to drive more traffic to the website in question.

These two different viewpoints, if combined, can often deliver the best of both worlds and not only help visitors to the site find the information they are looking for, but also make it easy for users to find the site in the first place. Design-oriented web developers may be forced to rely on advertising, such as Google Adwords, to bring visitors to their site. Developers who are more technically aware may not create sites with a strong visual appeal. However, they may end up attracting more organic search engine traffic.

Regardless of the approach, the important aspects of a website will always be the same: content, usability and design are the three most important elements to web page design and pages that are strong in all these three areas have a better chance of attracting an audience and being successful.

While some attractive websites may have an initial aesthetic appeal, if they are laden down with graphics, audio, Flash or video files, they may be slow to load. This can frustrate potential visitors and can lead to less traffic than would otherwise be the case. Each page in a website should take just a few seconds to download.

Content is also extremely important. Both search engines and humans are attracted to good content. If your site has original content which is not available elsewhere on the Internet, it stands to reason it will get visitors. If users visit a site and it does not contain the kind of information they want, they will simply leave in search of better information.

When planning and designing your website, a useful exercise is always to try to place yourself in your visitors’ shoes. What are they searching for? How much of it can you give them? How can you make your version of it more attractive than what’s on offer from your competitors?

For more information on Dreamweaver training courses, visit Macresource Computer Training, a UK IT training company offering Dreamweaver training courses at their central London training centre.

Creating Cascading Style Sheets With Adobe Dreamweaver

Because of its ability to separate design from content, Cascading Style Sheets (CSS) has become an extremely important technology in web development. A single CSS document can contain information regarding the position of elements on all the pages in a web site as well as style information such as font, sizes and colours. In terms of building websites, CSS definitely represents the future.

Because of its ability to separate design from content, Cascading Style Sheets (CSS) has become an extremely important technology in web development. A single CSS document can contain information regarding the position of elements on all the pages in a web site as well as style information such as font, sizes and colours. In terms of building websites, CSS definitely represents the future.

Adobe Dreamweaver has long had support for the use of CSS and has responded to the growing importance of this pivotal technology. Dreamweaver’s implementation of CSS is all the more important since many of the people using the program are not specialist web developers and rely on Dreamweaver to guide them through the maze of technologies which drive web pages.

One of the most noticeable changes in this the latest version of Dreamweaver is that users are now positively encouraged to create web pages using CSS for page layout rather than tables. Each time a new web page or template is created, Dreamweaver offers you a choice of basing the page on one of about thirty preset CSS layouts with names like “3 Column Elastic” and “3 Column Fixed”.

CSS page layout is based in the DIV element, an HTML container which can be used to hold an arbitrary amount of web content. The CSS rules control the appearance and positioning of DIVs on the page. Dreamweaver CS3’s preset CSS layouts create a series of DIVs containing placeholder text and basic formatting. The placeholder text, as well as the code underlying the page, both contain useful explanations of how the page has been constructed and a few tips on how to personalise them.

The CSS code for pages created using Dreamweaver’s preset layouts is embedded in the page itself. If a user creates a series of such pages, each one will have its own CSS code making updating very time-consuming. It is far more efficient to have all of the CSS code in one external file and link each page to this one file. At present, Dreamweaver doesn’t really make this clear to new users. However, it does have an excellent feature for moving embedded CSS code into an external file. You simply select all of the CSS definitions you wish to externalise then choose Text – CSS Styles – Move CSS Rules.

This ability to move blocks of CSS is an excellent feature but one has to ask if new users will see its significance and actually use it. The fact is that, given the increasing importance of CSS and Dreamweaver’s role as the fledgling developers best friend, the program could use some improvement in the way it handles CSS.

Another area where Dreamweaver still handles CSS inefficiently is the way in which it generates CSS class styles with names like “style1”, “style2”, etc. whenever the user applies attributes like font, size or colour to highlighted text. This must be really confusing for beginners and can easily be solved by simply removing these “raw” attributes and replacing them with CSS-friendly options.

If you would like to learn more about Dreamweaver training courses, visit Macresource Computer Training, a UK IT training company offering Dreamweaver Classes at their central London training centre.